September 19, 2014
Philadelphians: you need to check out the David Bowie Is film screening at Ritz Five on Tuesday. I believe tickets are still available.

Philadelphians: you need to check out the David Bowie Is film screening at Ritz Five on Tuesday. I believe tickets are still available.

10:00am  |   URL: http://tmblr.co/ZbTBCy1RAZYyh
  
Filed under: David Bowie 
September 18, 2014

There’s a dude twirling fire in front of the venue @strandofoaks is playing tonight, so you know it’s going to be a good show. (at Arden Gild Hall)

September 18, 2014
Trane at Temple.

Trane at Temple.

September 18, 2014
Definitely a great idea to watch this in the dark before bed.

Definitely a great idea to watch this in the dark before bed.

12:48am  |   URL: http://tmblr.co/ZbTBCy1R4jfFS
Filed under: twin peaks BOB 
September 16, 2014
Demolition casual. #Philly (at Chestnut Street)

Demolition casual. #Philly (at Chestnut Street)

12:53pm  |   URL: http://tmblr.co/ZbTBCy1Qytaul
  
Filed under: philly 
September 13, 2014
My peoples @hopalongtheband are totally crushing the @MannCenter skyline stage! \m/#lawnofmann (at The Mann Center - Skyline Stage)

My peoples @hopalongtheband are totally crushing the @MannCenter skyline stage! \m/#lawnofmann (at The Mann Center - Skyline Stage)

6:46pm  |   URL: http://tmblr.co/ZbTBCy1Qkl6gd
Filed under: lawnofmann 
September 8, 2014
#FilmNoir series at A-Space this fall looks pretty awesome. (at A-Space Anarchist Community Center)

#FilmNoir series at A-Space this fall looks pretty awesome. (at A-Space Anarchist Community Center)

8:19pm  |   URL: http://tmblr.co/ZbTBCy1QMRz0z
Filed under: filmnoir 
September 8, 2014

Hate to sound like such a philistine, but I’m glad Ariel Pink is back to writing songy-songs. This one will be in my head for the rest of the night.

worldcafe:

LISTEN: Ariel Pink has an infectious new single called “Put Your Number In My Phone.” His new album, pom pom, is out on 4AD Records on November 18th.

Preorder the album here.

September 8, 2014
nprfreshair:

When The Great Gatsby was published in 1925, it flopped. In fact, it didn’t get its second wind until World War II when it was given to soldiers to carry in their pockets—over 123,000 copies were distributed. 
Today we talk about the history of Gatsby and why it endures. Fresh Air’s book critic Maureen Corrigan just wrote a book about this very subject. It’s called “So We Read On,” a reference to the final words of Gatsby, “And So we beat on, boats against the current, borne back ceaselessly into the past.”
In the conversation, Corrigan tells us that Gatsby has quite a few film noir tropes: 

"Gatsby almost has the form of a film noir, where you have this voiceover with [narrator] Nick Carraway remembering things that have taken place in the past, things that can’t be changed, events that can’t be changed.
It’s a violent story. There are three violent deaths in Gatsby. It’s a story in which you get bootlegging, crime, explicit sexuality — and remember this is 1925 when it was published, so it’s pretty racy for its time.
… We don’t explicitly read about [sex] but in Chapter Two, Nick is taken along by Tom Buchanan … on a joy ride into Manhattan where Tom takes Nick to … a drunken party in The Love Nest. So we know that there’s infidelity — a lot of innuendo — about people having sex outside of marriage and a lot of drinking.
And, most importantly, film noir, hardboiled detective fiction and The Great Gatsby — they’re all stories that are obsessed with the presence of fate. There’s a very fated feel to Gatsby. Events that occur in the novel, they’re foretold many times. That car crash in which Myrtle Wilson is killed, Tom’s mistress, there are two other car crashes that preceded that car crash. So a lot of events are predicted in this novel.”


Photo: Benn Mitchell 

Best book.

nprfreshair:

When The Great Gatsby was published in 1925, it flopped. In fact, it didn’t get its second wind until World War II when it was given to soldiers to carry in their pockets—over 123,000 copies were distributed. 

Today we talk about the history of Gatsby and why it endures. Fresh Air’s book critic Maureen Corrigan just wrote a book about this very subject. It’s called “So We Read On,” a reference to the final words of Gatsby, “And So we beat on, boats against the current, borne back ceaselessly into the past.”

In the conversation, Corrigan tells us that Gatsby has quite a few film noir tropes: 

"Gatsby almost has the form of a film noir, where you have this voiceover with [narrator] Nick Carraway remembering things that have taken place in the past, things that can’t be changed, events that can’t be changed.

It’s a violent story. There are three violent deaths in Gatsby. It’s a story in which you get bootlegging, crime, explicit sexuality — and remember this is 1925 when it was published, so it’s pretty racy for its time.

… We don’t explicitly read about [sex] but in Chapter Two, Nick is taken along by Tom Buchanan … on a joy ride into Manhattan where Tom takes Nick to … a drunken party in The Love Nest. So we know that there’s infidelity — a lot of innuendo — about people having sex outside of marriage and a lot of drinking.

And, most importantly, film noir, hardboiled detective fiction and The Great Gatsby — they’re all stories that are obsessed with the presence of fate. There’s a very fated feel to Gatsby. Events that occur in the novel, they’re foretold many times. That car crash in which Myrtle Wilson is killed, Tom’s mistress, there are two other car crashes that preceded that car crash. So a lot of events are predicted in this novel.”

Photo: Benn Mitchell 

Best book.

September 7, 2014
The bag man is getting an attitude with me. (at Springer St.)

The bag man is getting an attitude with me. (at Springer St.)

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