September 8, 2014
nprfreshair:

When The Great Gatsby was published in 1925, it flopped. In fact, it didn’t get its second wind until World War II when it was given to soldiers to carry in their pockets—over 123,000 copies were distributed. 
Today we talk about the history of Gatsby and why it endures. Fresh Air’s book critic Maureen Corrigan just wrote a book about this very subject. It’s called “So We Read On,” a reference to the final words of Gatsby, “And So we beat on, boats against the current, borne back ceaselessly into the past.”
In the conversation, Corrigan tells us that Gatsby has quite a few film noir tropes: 

"Gatsby almost has the form of a film noir, where you have this voiceover with [narrator] Nick Carraway remembering things that have taken place in the past, things that can’t be changed, events that can’t be changed.
It’s a violent story. There are three violent deaths in Gatsby. It’s a story in which you get bootlegging, crime, explicit sexuality — and remember this is 1925 when it was published, so it’s pretty racy for its time.
… We don’t explicitly read about [sex] but in Chapter Two, Nick is taken along by Tom Buchanan … on a joy ride into Manhattan where Tom takes Nick to … a drunken party in The Love Nest. So we know that there’s infidelity — a lot of innuendo — about people having sex outside of marriage and a lot of drinking.
And, most importantly, film noir, hardboiled detective fiction and The Great Gatsby — they’re all stories that are obsessed with the presence of fate. There’s a very fated feel to Gatsby. Events that occur in the novel, they’re foretold many times. That car crash in which Myrtle Wilson is killed, Tom’s mistress, there are two other car crashes that preceded that car crash. So a lot of events are predicted in this novel.”


Photo: Benn Mitchell 

Best book.

nprfreshair:

When The Great Gatsby was published in 1925, it flopped. In fact, it didn’t get its second wind until World War II when it was given to soldiers to carry in their pockets—over 123,000 copies were distributed. 

Today we talk about the history of Gatsby and why it endures. Fresh Air’s book critic Maureen Corrigan just wrote a book about this very subject. It’s called “So We Read On,” a reference to the final words of Gatsby, “And So we beat on, boats against the current, borne back ceaselessly into the past.”

In the conversation, Corrigan tells us that Gatsby has quite a few film noir tropes: 

"Gatsby almost has the form of a film noir, where you have this voiceover with [narrator] Nick Carraway remembering things that have taken place in the past, things that can’t be changed, events that can’t be changed.

It’s a violent story. There are three violent deaths in Gatsby. It’s a story in which you get bootlegging, crime, explicit sexuality — and remember this is 1925 when it was published, so it’s pretty racy for its time.

… We don’t explicitly read about [sex] but in Chapter Two, Nick is taken along by Tom Buchanan … on a joy ride into Manhattan where Tom takes Nick to … a drunken party in The Love Nest. So we know that there’s infidelity — a lot of innuendo — about people having sex outside of marriage and a lot of drinking.

And, most importantly, film noir, hardboiled detective fiction and The Great Gatsby — they’re all stories that are obsessed with the presence of fate. There’s a very fated feel to Gatsby. Events that occur in the novel, they’re foretold many times. That car crash in which Myrtle Wilson is killed, Tom’s mistress, there are two other car crashes that preceded that car crash. So a lot of events are predicted in this novel.”

Photo: Benn Mitchell 

Best book.

September 7, 2014
The bag man is getting an attitude with me. (at Springer St.)

The bag man is getting an attitude with me. (at Springer St.)

September 5, 2014

The Key Studio Sessions Volume 11; my latest compilation of awesome Philly musicians, for free download now.

September 5, 2014
bobsweeney:

Santa Monica Beach (2014)Santa Monica beach. I accidentally flashed the negatives and the resulting images are a bit overexposed. Photo by Bob Sweeney. Camera: Yunon DX-3 / Film: Kodak Tri-X 35mm.

bobsweeney:

Santa Monica Beach (2014)

Santa Monica beach. I accidentally flashed the negatives and the resulting images are a bit overexposed. Photo by Bob Sweeney. Camera: Yunon DX-3 / Film: Kodak Tri-X 35mm.

September 5, 2014

moarrrmagazine:

RobynTell You (Today) 
- Loose Joints cover -

brilliant cover for Red Hot's forthcoming Master Mix: Red Hot + Arthur Russell compilation for AIDS awareness

A discotastic jam y’all.

8:46am  |   URL: http://tmblr.co/ZbTBCy1Q3iLV-
  
Filed under: robyn 
September 3, 2014

A smooth new jam from Khari Ferrari.

kharimateen:

New Music:

‪”Wanting More‬”
Video: http://youtu.be/nuqQufCufRM
Download: https://itun.es/i6gG2Pt

September 3, 2014
This movie, what the friggin hell. (Phantom of the Paradise, 1974)

This movie, what the friggin hell. (Phantom of the Paradise, 1974)

September 2, 2014

Amazing.

moarrrmagazine:

Collages by John Stezaker

(via fromupinatreehouse)

September 2, 2014

"Other genres you don’t even really have to rhyme / Can’t even understand what cats be saying half the time / Kurt Cobain you couldn’t understand shit / That shit was hot tho I ain’t tryna diss / Too late, y’all already pissed."

September 1, 2014

Kanye West at Made in America, a set on Flickr.
Wasn’t one of the 10 photogs who got to shoot Kanye from the pit at Made in America this weekend, so I just took photos from the audience. My 70-200 works wonders, and his set was a freaking throwdown.

Kanye West at Made in AmericaKanye West at Made in AmericaKanye West at Made in America

Kanye West at Made in America, a set on Flickr.

Wasn’t one of the 10 photogs who got to shoot Kanye from the pit at Made in America this weekend, so I just took photos from the audience. My 70-200 works wonders, and his set was a freaking throwdown.

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